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Aug 04 2015

Chronic Diseases in China: An Opportunity for Standardized Education Programs and Enhanced Collaboration

Non-Com Disease Impact.2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A recently released report “2015 Situation of Nutrition and Chronic Diseases of Chinese Residents,” indicates the incidence and mortality of chronic diseases continue to increase and have become the main causes of death in China with 79.4% of total mortality due to chronic diseases.  According to statistics, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and respiratory disease have become the top four of major threats to China’s public health.

The report stated that the relative low quality of treatment and lack of standardized clinical training in China are a contributing reason for the increased incidence and mortality rate of chronic diseases. Because of the need for long-term treatment, high incidence of complication, high rate of deformity, and high mortality, China needs advanced research, better databases, improved standardized clinical practice and medical training in order to better control the rate of incidence and mortality of chronic diseases.

The report provides a current overview on key chronic diseases:

  • Hypertension: incidence rate increased to 25.2%.
  • Diabetes: Chinese are facing an incidence rate of 9.7%. In China, about 70% diabetics do not get diagnosed, and among those who are diagnosed only 25% receive treatment.  For those receiving treatments, only 40% have conditions that are arrested and reversed.
  • Cancer and Tumor: incidence of cancer is up to 235 out of 100,000 people. Lung and breast cancer are the leading cancer types. The mortality of cancer is 144.3 out of 100,000 people with the top five cancers:  lung, liver, stomach, esophagus, and colorectal.
  • Chronic Respiratory Disease: include COPD, Asthma, Pulmonary hypertension and Sleep-disorder breathing. With the increased mortality of 68 out of 100,000 people. The incidence rate of COPD among those older than 40 years old is 9.9%.

In order to address this, China needs to keep up with advanced practice in Western medicine.  The National Health and Family Planning Committee (NHFPC) encourages enhanced cooperation and exchange of Chinese and international medicine societies in the areas of academic research, college training, and technical expertise. Herein lies many opportunities for US heath care associations to explore deeper levels of collaboration with their Chinese counterparts for the improvement of public health globally.

MCI China suggests that US medical associations with an interest in China should observe the following:

  1. Closely monitor and be sensitive to Chinese government policies and reforms because they shape and sway market development. The 12th Five-Year Plan puts healthcare reform in the spotlight, and has seen successes and challenges. The 13th Five-Plan that will be released in 2016 is expected to deepen the healthcare reform.
  2. Due to the vastly different institutional, environment and cultural factors between China and USA, it is important to invest in market insight to fully understand Chinese needs so that your association can be effective in identifying the unique selling point of your offerings.  Know that each sub-specialty will have its own unique situation and factors, therefore the maturity and/or need doesn’t equal the same for another.
  3. Understand the role of industry support and compliance requirements to build a strong stakeholder approach.

It is vital that US associations seek to collaborate with their Chinese counterparts; consider the use of local market development personnel who can help to investigate and navigate the complexities in relationships between various Chinese associations, and key opinion leaders in the same field.

Feb 27 2015

China’s New National Plan for Health Service System – An Opportunity for US Healthcare Associations?

China HC market

 

 

This article was written by Maria Tong, senior director, association management and consulting from MCI Beijing office.

On October 29, 2014, China released a draft of the National Plan for Health Service System, featuring the country’s goals and priorities on developing the public health framework in the next five years. The plan aims to adjust the layout of the medical and health resources, improve the service ability and the resources use efficiency.

There are a few findings from the plan that may be interesting to the US healthcare associations.

The plan set a goal to significantly increase the number of registered doctors and registered nurses by 2020, anticipating an increase of 25% for registered doctors and 50% for registered nurses.  To achieve the goal, China has to improve the current weak medical educational system.

This creates opportunities for US healthcare associations to work with the Chinese government and hospitals to introduce standardized and professional body of knowledge to Chinese medical practitioners.  It is important to note that the plan stressed to enhance the training for General Doctors and Residence Doctors.

The plan encourages establishing private owned hospitals, including foreign invested hospitals, to relieve the pressure of Chinese public hospitals.  This implies the changing role of public hospitals with the rise of new private hospitals.  Therefore, US associations specializing in hospital management, quality control, and medical information management should pay attention to these emerging needs and seek opportunities to enter into the market to ride this new wave of opportunity.

The Plan emphasizes the training to overcome talent shortage especially in Chinese Medicine, Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mental Health, Aged Care, Infectious Diseases, Stomatology, and Rehabilitation, etc.

Here are some suggestions for US associations considering the China market:

  • Understand the market needs. It is critical to conduct market analysis to understand the challenges and issues in the profession, and how your products and services can be applied to the market to help solve local problems and meet local interests.

  • Make a feasible action plan. You need a plan based on sound market intelligence with a solid business and operation model, development activities, and financial budget to ensure you don’t get off track and can make progressive steps.

  • Get people on the ground who possess the proper business expertise and local knowledge to pursue opportunities and overcome barriers.  Talents must be familiar with the culture and language to help you.  Simply running and monitoring your business from the US will not make for a sustainable growth in China.

  • Take a lesson from your corporate counterparts.  According to the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai the average for a US business to become profitable in China is between 5-8 years.

Global growth requires determination, local insight, and the right business capacity to turn your products, services and membership into value that local stakeholders will appreciate.

 

 

Jan 31 2015

Top 10 Sustainable Event Trends for 2020

sustainability engine benefits

For many years, MCI has been active globally among corporations, governments, university and non-profit sectors to develop, implement and promote sustainability strategies for meeting industry destination and service suppliers as well as corporate and association executives seeking to reduce the negative impact of their meetings.  Guy Bigwood, leads MCI’s Sustainability Services group which has produced a number of global chief executive events on sustainability to help to accelerate sustainable practices into corporate strategy around the world.

In demand as a speaker and workshop facilitator, Guy recently wrote an article of the leading trends that will impact meeting and conventions around the world.  Herewith are Guy’s thoughts on the future and its impact on our meetings.

Between now and 2020, we predict that organisers will adopt the following 10 key trends to improve the sustainability performance of their events. Aside from helping the planet, these trends will also improve attendee experiences, build stronger communities and generate significant cost-savings.

1 – Transparency & Ethics

Between now and 2020, organisations will make it a priority to more effectively communicate their sustainability strategies and progress. Event brands and enterprises will become more creative and better at storytelling, and consequently we will see a rise in online sustainability reports such as MCI’s Sustainability Report. International mega events will continue to be closely scrutinised and expected to lead the way in terms of compliance and ethics, with issues exposed quickly when they arise (see Qatar World Cup 2020 as an example.) With the global demand for increased transparency, we’ll see more legislation and an increase in both public and client demand for anticorruption and ethics programmes. The focus on compliance in the healthcare industry will increasingly affect other industries such as technology and finance.

2 – Sustainable Food

In 2014, sustainable food was the number one trend for US Chefs. The demand for locally-produced, organic, Fairtrade and sustainable options will continue to grow in the global events industry, with new research showing that sustainable menus improve overall delegate satisfaction. A growth in demand will cause prices to fall and supply to increase, helping make sustainability a key criteria when selecting caterers and restaurants.

3 – Digital & Collaborative Creation

Mobile event apps and digital technologies have already massively reduced pre and onsite printing. By 2020, hybrid meetings will be now be the norm, reducing carbon emissions from travel and opening up meetings to those who would otherwise have been unable to attend. ‘Collaborative consumption’ and the shared economy will also have had a big impact. Many smaller events will be entirely organised using a mix of collaborative technology platforms such as Uber, AirBnB, TaskRabbit and hotelwalla, while dedicated event technology suites will combine bestin-class tools.

4 – The Power of Procurement

Today, 51% of MCI’s largest clients are already assessing sustainability to some degree, an increase from 25% in 2011. By 2020, sustainability will be a key factor in all purchasing decisions and procurement teams will be playing an increasingly important role in driving and managing a more sustainable supply chain.

5 – Sustainability Strategies Replace One-off Programmes

In 2014, 78% of MCI’s 70 biggest clients reported some form of sustainable event programme (up from 15% in 2011), however less than 10% had a comprehensive sustainability strategy. With resources, standards and tools becoming more readily available, and with more clients citing sustainability as critical, corporates will become more strategic and focused on the sustainability of their events. Today, the technology sector is leading with best practices demonstrated from global giants such as Symantec, Oracle, Cisco and Intel.

6 – Standards & Certification

Adoption of the ISO 20121 sustainable event standard will continue to increase. By 2020, we predict that the majority of large publicly funded events will require compliance with ISO20121, which will also be requested in many large corporate RFPs. There will be a growth in national and regional sustainable event standards, and we will also see a rise in destinations such as Barcelona that obtain independent verification of their sustainability management with certification systems such as Biosphere and Earthcheck.

7 – Waste

By 2020, we’ll have made good progress in reducing the amount of waste produced by an event and diverting that waste away from landfills. Organisers will be thinking “cradle to cradle” and integrating sustainable principles into their initial event design concepts, ensuring that event structures are made from materials that can easily and cheaply be reused, recycled and repurposed. PVC will be phased out, and more bio-materials, eco-substrates and new modular display systems will be used. Food waste unfortunately looks set to increase as the economy gets stronger, however some organisers and local governments may find more creative ways of donating food to local charities and food banks.

8 – Community

Organisations in the meetings industry will become more strategic about how and where they donate their time and money, with many organisations streamlining their donations to one or two key charities with clear links to their brand values and culture. Skills-based volunteerism will also lead the way, matching a charity’s needs to employees’ valuable skills. Online platforms will simplify the task of matching donors to causes, and we may see global web platforms such as Kiva using the event industry to amplify their impact.

9 – Aligned Brand Commitments & Operations

Today a key barrier to putting sustainability into action is the perception that sustainability is expensive, and this is preventing a large number of ‘sustainable brands’ from meeting their own commitments when it comes to sustainable events. Companies like MCI will become more skilled at measuring, validating and communicating the business case for long-term sustainability strategies – which in fact reduce costs, streamline operations and improve performance. As the business case for sustainability becomes louder and clearer, more brands will be willing to align their sustainability actions with their ideals.

10 – Sustainable Destinations

At the start of 2015, only a handful of cities such as Bangkok and Orlando can boast a multi-year destination sustainability strategy for their events industry. Between now and 2020, leading convention bureaus will start bringing together key stakeholders to develop a shared vision for the sustainable development of their city. Just as cities can now demonstrate the economic impact of events on their local economy, local governments will increasingly look to the events sector as powerful catalyst of social and environmental change.

For more ideas, research and best practices on sustainability as a strategy in business and meetings today, continue your reading of Guy and his team here.

 

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