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Category: MegaTrends & Research

Dec 05 2017

On Demand Webinar – American Engagement Index 2017: Getting More ROI from Engagement through Stronger Relationships

 

For two years, 20 associations have participated in the first ever benchmark indices designed to better understand how relationship strength affects the ability to improve engagement with members and customers through empirical data.

Thousands of members and customers from US and overseas responded as we sought to answer:

  1. How strong is the current relationship with members and customers?
  2. What is impacting for good or bad the quality of these relationships?
  3. What resources deliver the most value and impact engagement the most?
  4. How relevant is the value proposition to the needs of members and customers?
  5. What levels of engagement are there and how do members and customers fit into this model?

A recent webinar now provides a unique way to learn about the results of the 2017 Index and the thinking that it has inspired among the associations participating.  Hear from executives whose associations were part of the 2016 and 2017 benchmark studies.

Marc Beebe, CAE, Senior Director, Strategic Research, Public Imperatives, & Corporate   Development, IEEE   

Michael Gips, Chief Global Knowledge & Learning Officer, CAE, Chief Global Member Engagement Officer, ASIS International

Also participating was Jakov Cavar the managing director of FairControl, the research firm who partners with MCI to deliver the Engagement Index.

This on demand webinar will share and contrast the latest findings of the American and Global Engagement Indices illustrating how domestic and overseas customers and members view the effectiveness of US associations, and how associations use this data to inform and change strategy and operational planning.

 

To view this webinar, please follow this link.

Aug 04 2017

Benchmarking Member & Customer Relationship Strength -Keys to Sustaining Engagement ROI

Last week I had the pleasure of attending the latest CESSE Annual Meeting in Quebec City. Kudos to organizers for a very good educational event and to the supplier community of Quebec and Canada for an excellent immersive customer experience. If you haven’t had a chance to go to Quebec City – you are missing something special.

I was invited to moderate a panel discussion on the results from MCI’s Engagement Index Collaborative which includes data from the global (non-US) 2016 and domestic US 2017 study. Joining me on the program was Michael Gips from ASIS International and Patrick Gouhin, CAE, from the International Society of Automation. Sadly, we missed having Marc Beebe from IEEE (who the airline gods didn’t spare).

Our session was also about engagement but of a different kind, namely the interconnection between member and non-member relationship strength and its impact on retention and product sales. Results from this year’s American Engagement Index (AEI) focused for the first time on the US domestic market for ten large professional societies.

This Engagement Index community is a collaboration between MCI and its research partner FairControl and these US associations as we seek to address fundamental challenges facing sustainable growth today both globally and domestically through better data driven decision making. Both the global (GEI) and US (AEI) indexes seek answers from association members and customers on the underlying causes of stagnating/decreasing membership, flight to competitors, and higher member expectations & unmet needs.

Pat, Michael and I shared the following highlights from the AEI data released only in the last two weeks.

  1. Member and customer relationship strength is borderline weak in the US market. Compared to data from outside the US in 2016, this trend is actually consistent in that “mature markets” like Europe, Australia/NZ, Hong Kong, Japan or South Korea were only slightly higher scores (75 versus 78).
  2. Another trend that mirrors results from GEI was the impact of the “member only” segment or those who are members but do not use or buy products. Members who do not buy or use products have a significantly lower relationship strength and are a primary “detractor” among the membership whose likelihood to renew is very poor. They score the worst across all driver measures: brand awareness, benefits/value, offering, customer service, products and services, and communications and information. Conversely, we learned that the more products a member or non member customer uses or buys, the stronger the relationship and engagement level.
  3. Among US members, the older and more educated the member the less engaged they are. Their interests become less intense for core product offerings, but as they gain tenure, they are more interested in becoming involved in the association’s community.
  4. Products that are the most popular in the US are magazines, standards/codes/good practices, and peer review journals. When looking at a segmentation of the audience, newer US members act like non member customers – they want certification and practical training. Globally, the leader by a magnitude order of difference is certification/accreditation.
  5. In 2016, we introduced a customer relationship typology that groups members and customers by relationship strength to understand engagement fundamentals to improve activation strategies. In 2017, we learned that among US members, the highest concentration of the very weakest and the very strongest relationships are among longer tenured members.

To view the entire deck of charts go here.

Aug 04 2017

Strategically Evaluating Your Association’s Global Readiness and Effectiveness

ASAE Education Session on Monday, August 14, from 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM.

Join Greta Kotler of ASAE and Nikki Walker of MCI Group for the unveiling of an exciting new global management diagnostic tool that associations will be able to use to improve strategy and operational planning.  

International expansion is an increasingly important issue to associations, the needs of members for their associations to help them embrace globalization, and opportunities to reach new markets and revenue sources outside the U.S.   International success requires global maturity in strategy and operational execution to expand and thrive.

To address this reality, ASAE Foundation and MCI, along with technical support from Rockbridge Associates, developed a scientific Global Maturity Assessment Tool that associations can use to assess their own level of maturity, diagnose areas for improvement, and in the process, garner insights on how to succeed when deploying in international markets.

This effort builds on earlier data gathered by the Foundation and MCI, and relies on a robust survey of 90 senior leaders from associations in various stages of international growth.

One outcome of this effort is the assessment tool, available to ASAE members, that includes a comprehensive list of 47 attributes on which leaders can rate their associations.  These attributes are found from seven critical areas of focus:

  • Strategic and Business Planning

  • Management and Organizational Culture

  • Leadership Engagement

  • Market Insight

  • Product Relevance: Value Proposition and Engagement Model

  • Global Organization, Roles and Support

  • Local Operations and Service Delivery Capacity

Another outcome consists of the findings of the benchmark survey, which tells a story about the state of U.S. associations in their international efforts.

  • The average level of association global maturity is 44 out of 100, which equates to being in the early stage of Developing/Functional.  As shown in the figure above, slightly more than a fourth (27%) of associations are Fully Mature/Effective and another quarter (24%) are Developing/Functional.  Only 14 percent are classified as having “No Readiness,” indicating they are at the onset of international expansion or have failed to take the steps necessary to succeed.

  • The maturity level matters because it correlates closely with other measures of success.  More mature associations (based on the assessment questions in the survey) have:  more satisfied international members/customers, higher satisfaction among leadership with their success in operating/entering international markets, growth rates that are more likely to meet or exceed expectations, and fewer problems.

Learn behaviors and processes that lead to global success and advance association goals, and gain access and insights into the self-diagnostic tool that rates overall global maturity and shows areas for improvement.

Work with colleagues in an interactive exercise to generate fresh thinking toward improving global strategy and operational planning.

This is a project from the continuing Global Management Series by the ASAE Foundation and MCI Group dedicated to helping associations grow globally and operate effectively outside of the U.S.

Receive information on the Global Maturity Assessment by stopping by the MCI booth #724 during the Toronto convention.