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Category Archive: Channel Mgmt: Partners – Sponsors – Sales

Aug 04 2015

Chronic Diseases in China: An Opportunity for Standardized Education Programs and Enhanced Collaboration

Non-Com Disease Impact.2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A recently released report “2015 Situation of Nutrition and Chronic Diseases of Chinese Residents,” indicates the incidence and mortality of chronic diseases continue to increase and have become the main causes of death in China with 79.4% of total mortality due to chronic diseases.  According to statistics, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and respiratory disease have become the top four of major threats to China’s public health.

The report stated that the relative low quality of treatment and lack of standardized clinical training in China are a contributing reason for the increased incidence and mortality rate of chronic diseases. Because of the need for long-term treatment, high incidence of complication, high rate of deformity, and high mortality, China needs advanced research, better databases, improved standardized clinical practice and medical training in order to better control the rate of incidence and mortality of chronic diseases.

The report provides a current overview on key chronic diseases:

  • Hypertension: incidence rate increased to 25.2%.
  • Diabetes: Chinese are facing an incidence rate of 9.7%. In China, about 70% diabetics do not get diagnosed, and among those who are diagnosed only 25% receive treatment.  For those receiving treatments, only 40% have conditions that are arrested and reversed.
  • Cancer and Tumor: incidence of cancer is up to 235 out of 100,000 people. Lung and breast cancer are the leading cancer types. The mortality of cancer is 144.3 out of 100,000 people with the top five cancers:  lung, liver, stomach, esophagus, and colorectal.
  • Chronic Respiratory Disease: include COPD, Asthma, Pulmonary hypertension and Sleep-disorder breathing. With the increased mortality of 68 out of 100,000 people. The incidence rate of COPD among those older than 40 years old is 9.9%.

In order to address this, China needs to keep up with advanced practice in Western medicine.  The National Health and Family Planning Committee (NHFPC) encourages enhanced cooperation and exchange of Chinese and international medicine societies in the areas of academic research, college training, and technical expertise. Herein lies many opportunities for US heath care associations to explore deeper levels of collaboration with their Chinese counterparts for the improvement of public health globally.

MCI China suggests that US medical associations with an interest in China should observe the following:

  1. Closely monitor and be sensitive to Chinese government policies and reforms because they shape and sway market development. The 12th Five-Year Plan puts healthcare reform in the spotlight, and has seen successes and challenges. The 13th Five-Plan that will be released in 2016 is expected to deepen the healthcare reform.
  2. Due to the vastly different institutional, environment and cultural factors between China and USA, it is important to invest in market insight to fully understand Chinese needs so that your association can be effective in identifying the unique selling point of your offerings.  Know that each sub-specialty will have its own unique situation and factors, therefore the maturity and/or need doesn’t equal the same for another.
  3. Understand the role of industry support and compliance requirements to build a strong stakeholder approach.

It is vital that US associations seek to collaborate with their Chinese counterparts; consider the use of local market development personnel who can help to investigate and navigate the complexities in relationships between various Chinese associations, and key opinion leaders in the same field.

Feb 27 2015

China’s New National Plan for Health Service System – An Opportunity for US Healthcare Associations?

China HC market

 

 

This article was written by Maria Tong, senior director, association management and consulting from MCI Beijing office.

On October 29, 2014, China released a draft of the National Plan for Health Service System, featuring the country’s goals and priorities on developing the public health framework in the next five years. The plan aims to adjust the layout of the medical and health resources, improve the service ability and the resources use efficiency.

There are a few findings from the plan that may be interesting to the US healthcare associations.

The plan set a goal to significantly increase the number of registered doctors and registered nurses by 2020, anticipating an increase of 25% for registered doctors and 50% for registered nurses.  To achieve the goal, China has to improve the current weak medical educational system.

This creates opportunities for US healthcare associations to work with the Chinese government and hospitals to introduce standardized and professional body of knowledge to Chinese medical practitioners.  It is important to note that the plan stressed to enhance the training for General Doctors and Residence Doctors.

The plan encourages establishing private owned hospitals, including foreign invested hospitals, to relieve the pressure of Chinese public hospitals.  This implies the changing role of public hospitals with the rise of new private hospitals.  Therefore, US associations specializing in hospital management, quality control, and medical information management should pay attention to these emerging needs and seek opportunities to enter into the market to ride this new wave of opportunity.

The Plan emphasizes the training to overcome talent shortage especially in Chinese Medicine, Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mental Health, Aged Care, Infectious Diseases, Stomatology, and Rehabilitation, etc.

Here are some suggestions for US associations considering the China market:

  • Understand the market needs. It is critical to conduct market analysis to understand the challenges and issues in the profession, and how your products and services can be applied to the market to help solve local problems and meet local interests.

  • Make a feasible action plan. You need a plan based on sound market intelligence with a solid business and operation model, development activities, and financial budget to ensure you don’t get off track and can make progressive steps.

  • Get people on the ground who possess the proper business expertise and local knowledge to pursue opportunities and overcome barriers.  Talents must be familiar with the culture and language to help you.  Simply running and monitoring your business from the US will not make for a sustainable growth in China.

  • Take a lesson from your corporate counterparts.  According to the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai the average for a US business to become profitable in China is between 5-8 years.

Global growth requires determination, local insight, and the right business capacity to turn your products, services and membership into value that local stakeholders will appreciate.

 

 

Jun 30 2014

Partnering in China – Podcast Interview with Maria Tong

Partnering in China podcast

Earlier this year, our GrowGlobally readers responded to a survey on the topics of most importance to them.  Our first response to GrowGlobally reader  survey preferences will be on partnering in China.

As the results from the recent ASAE Foundation Study sponsored by MCI has shown, it isn’t that associations are not partnering.   The vast majority are.   Unfortunately, not all partnership deals are good ones for various reasons from over expectation to poor partner selection due diligence to a lack of appreciation of the different types of partnerships.

One such example is the over reliance on local national societies to carry the weight to help US associations expand their business interests.  It is unwise to depend on such local societies especially those located in emerging markets or less developed countries.  Many of these associations struggle to manage their own activities with smaller budgets, smaller volunteer networks, fewer staff, and do not possess the core competencies to support the growth of business commercially.

However, local societies do act well as “multipliers” in their ability to connect you to end users (customers, member prospects, local subject matter experts).

MCI would like to offer some suggestions as you evaluate local national societies in your efforts to partner locally around the world.   Use the following criteria to determine a potential client’s capabilities to serve your interests.

  1. Market Knowledge – ability to see changes in the local perception of industry or academia resulting in better participation, interest in your brand or to identify and remedy dissent?
  2. Management – possibility of leadership changes in their ranks that could weaken or hinder your activities?
  3. Infrastructure – strength of its local network to provide needed expertise at the point of need?
  4. Competency – business expertise to perform required responsibilities?
  5. Commitment –interest of the existing political and administration leaders to provide ongoing infrastructure and financial support?
  6. Politics – changing attitudes among core local leadership that could retard or undermine support or relations?
  7. Culture – degree to which bureaucratic culture stifles performance?
  8. Scalability – ability to transfer your success to other markets within the country?

MCI China’s Maria Tong was recently in Washington DC and we took the opportunity to interview her on the role of partnerships in China.

This interview is the first of three podcasts which will appear this summer on GrowGlobally.

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To view Maria’s interview, please click on the image above.

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